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My Reviews

Items 1-3 of 3 total

I Can Tolerate Almost Anything--But Not This

Posted on Jan 08, 2012

Purchased at iHerb

Some people claim to like the taste of spirulina. You and I are not one of them. Yet the benefits of spirulina are undeniable. So what to do? Well, I thought masking it with carob and mint might help. Especially coming from Pure Planet. They are solid company. Their barley and wheat grass products are excellent. This one, however, was a mistake. A big one. The taste is terrible. Dreadful. Awful. Horrifying. It tastes like plain old spirulina, i.e., seaweed sludge. Not carob. Not mint. And certainly not carob-mint. Now, unlike many reviewers, I usually don’t dock points for taste. If it works it works. Hold your nose and take it. But this is an exception. You’re supposed to suck on these things. The gall of Pure Planet . . . to make something so putrid into a tablet and to expect anyone to suck on them for more than two seconds is to inflict cruel, unusual and unnecessary punishment. Another thing: If you’ve ever had spirulina before you know how bad it can stain. This stuff is no exception: it sticks to your teeth, tongue, gums, and lips. So your reward for sucking on these bad boys for more than a few seconds is that it makes you look like you took a bite out of Swamp Thing. Your breath will also smell terrible. If you attempt to use these in public, or during the day, or before you go out--as I thought I could based on comments made by previous reviewers--expect to get fired from your job and shunned from society at large. I can honestly see how these little suckers could easily destroy perfectly good lives. In short: get the powder. Please. Mask it anyway you can. And for the love of everything holy stay far, far away from these. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.

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In Theory, This Should Be An Excellent Product—But, Unfortunately, I Am Not Impressed

Posted on Mar 26, 2012

Purchased at iHerb

The Short Story: Vitamineral Green is a seemingly good product that’s held back by some crucial factors: There’s no nutrition label, no way to know its macro-nutrient breakdown, and no way to know something as trivial as how many servings of vegetables it contains per recommended dosage (and so on). Lastly: I simply did not feel any different after taking it every day for three months. The Long Story: I wanted to like this product, I really did. As a vegan, it's hard to come by a supplement company that is as concerned about its ethics as it is about its profits. Healthforce is a rare exception in this case. Two big thumbs-up for that. And Vitamineral Green looks to be an amazing product; after all, it's Healthforce’s “golden boy” to use Seinfeld-speak. Not to mention that it’s gotten rave reviews all over the net (including here). So I bought it. Yet, despite the hype (and my enthusiasm), I have come to be majorly disappointed. Simply put: I feel no different after three months of use. Given the cost of the product, I definitely want to “feel” something. Some more cons: There’s no nutrition label, so I cannot tell how much of whatever ingredient it is that I’m getting. And it seems rather odd that Dr. Sheridan—the owner of Healthforce—would claim that the product could be used in place of a multivitamin, which is how I have been using it (clearly an act of good faith on my part). But, given my subpar results, I'm no longer convinced. And I wouldn't recommend anyone to follow in my footsteps. Cover your bases. Take a multi (preferably vegan, thank you). Conclusion: In theory, this product should be excellent. But in practice, it fails to live up to the hype. I’m not sure how others are able to overlook the shortcomings I’ve discussed above, but perhaps it works better for them. As for me, I will be happy to support Healthforce once they decide to let me know what I’m putting in my body so I can know where I’m coming up short. In the mean time, I have come across Garden of Life’s “Raw Organic Green Superfood” and will be giving it a go once I get through the few bottles of Vitamineral Green that I have left. At the very least, it has a nutrition label. UPDATE (7/21/11): 7/21/11: A few months after this review was posted I had given Garden of Life’s “Raw Organic Green Superfood” (as called “Perfect Food RAW”) a fair shot. I used it consistently and as directed. But as with Vitamineral Green the results were the same: I felt no difference in my “state of being.” Now, Perfect Food RAW does have a nutrition label and I suggested that this was an improvement over Vitamineral Green’s lack of nutritional information. However, an e-mail exchange with Garden of Life representative (Jenna) revealed that it is impossible to know how many servings of veggies are in a serving of Perfect Food RAW. She writes: “Thank you for your email and interest in Garden of Life's products. We do not currently have an ORAC value for Perfect Food RAW, therefore we cannot tell you how many servings of fruit & vegetables are in one serving of Perfect Food RAW.” This is very disappointing. And one wonders how it is possible for a product that touts the benefits of “green super foods” (as does Vitamineral Green) to not have the means to answer a very simple question. With that said, I have recently been using “The Ultimate Meal” and will post my results in a month or so. I hope this information has been helpful.

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Made In China

Posted on Apr 21, 2013

Purchased at iHerb

After the earthquake hit in Japan, I started to wonder where exactly my spirulina was coming from and how it might be affected (given the contamination of the water). Well, I never did find a good answer, but I do know that large quantities of spirulina are sourced from areas that are, let’s say, problematic (including Japan). With this in mind, after looking at the ingredients list in this product, I contacted Rainbow Light to find out where exactly their spirulina is sourced from. I got the following response: “The spirulina is organically grown in China. Our buyer has audited the facility and it is a very clean, safe and reliable factory. It is tested for microorganisms, heavy metal contamination, nutrient profile etc.” I was very disappointed to hear this. And the words “China” and “very clean, safe and reliable factory” is not a combination that I trust and neither should you. Buyer beware.

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Items 1-3 of 3 total

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